“The Purge†offers a glimpse into the future

Brittani Hill

Fast-forward 13 years to the year 2022. Everything that we’ve been striving for, low unemployment rates, less crime, and even low gas prices, has finally been attained. It appears that we’ve reached a near-perfect society.

At least that’s how it’s supposed to be in “The Purge.”

“Purge Day,” is an annual holiday implemented by the government that allows all crimes to be legal for 12 hours in the efforts of “purifying one’s soul,” comes only once a year to balance out human’s natural aggression and violence.

Ethan Hawke and Lena Headey star opposite each other as James and Mary Sardin. James and Mary, along with their post-pubescent teenager and softhearted preteen son, played by Adelaide Kane and Max Burkholder, live comfortable lives in a gated suburban community.

Writer-Director James DeMonaco attempts to pick the audience’s mind about the sacrifices that would be necessary to maintain a perfect civilization in this home-invasion thriller. But the idea can be quite frightening to some. Would we be willing to sacrifice 12 hours of mayhem for an otherwise perfect society?

Despite an obvious plot that was designed to give you the answers instead of making you think for yourself, DeMonaco delivers a thought-provoking film filled with the possibility of a government-approved population control method.

The ideas expressed in the movie are typical and anyone can easily predict the storyline without seeing the movie. With that being said, I won’t spoil the ending for you.

The film provides an extreme metaphor for the income gap in America today. As illustrated in the movie, those who are blessed with adequate income and status would be able to effectively protect themselves from Purge activities, while those who are not as fortunate are left to fend for themselves as they become Purge “sacrifices.” Is the sanctity of our civilization worth risking the dangers of a Purge Day? If anything, “The Purge” is a great conversation starter.