Unnecessary classes add up to student debt

Charles Rudison

Charles Rudison

In America thirty years ago, all you would have to do to pay for college was obtain a summer job. Today, you have to go thousands of dollars in debt to even afford to attend school.

With the rising costs of tuition, books and housing, students are beginning to wonder why college is so expensive, and to top it off schools are requiring us to take classes that have nothing to do with our field.

When I applied to Georgia Southern I signed up to major in marketing. I didn’t sign up to take astronomy, geography, or any other classes that don’t pertain to what I want to do in life.

Why do our universities require us to take unnecessary classes? The answer is to make money. Universities are ultimately businesses. Their goals are the same as any business, to make money and maximize profits.

The more classes we take, the more money the university receives. If we were only required to take classes that were associated with our fields we would only be here for two years at the most. Universities cannot run without money. It is just wrong to sap students for all you can by forcing them to take classes they don’t even need.

We took all the core classes we needed to take in high school. It is unnecessary for us to take those same classes again.

Not only would cutting out unnecessary prerequisite classes help out our pockets, but it would be a big morale boost and help some students actually want to stay in school.

For all my fellow impatient students the foreplay of prerequisite classes seems to be a huge turnoff and demoralizer. School would be much less stressful if we were able to get right into what we wanted to do with our lives instead of trying to figure out what the answer to y=mx+b is. We should be able to go to all the classes we need, get our degrees, and get out. Adding unnecessary classes is futile.

Some core classes are needed for certain majors, those things are understandable. It is just beyond foolish to force a finance major to take geography, and to force a engineering major to take astronomy.